Previously known as Physicians and Scientists for Responsible Genetics PSRGNZ - Charitable Trust
As required under the new 2005 Charities Act, PSGR has reregistered as a charitable trust.

One of the initial concerns lay with genetic engineering of crops. Members were concerned about the possible effects these crops could have on the environment and, through the introduction of new foods into the food chain, the impact on human health. Members believe that the release of genetically engineered organisms into the food chain and the environment is highly premature, as safety testing has not been adequately carried out.

With the increasing incidence of cancer and related diseases, we feel that the reliance on toxic chemical based agriculture should be phased out.


We support organic and sustainable agriculture as the preferred path for New Zealand. This would provide trade advantages and protection for New Zealand’s biodiversity.

Genetic engineering biotechnology goes hand in hand with intensive monoculture, using single crops grown in huge fields. Genetic engineering biotechnology will reduce biodiversity by promoting certain species above others.

Of the world’s 220 000 plant species, only 150 are currently grown commercially and just 20 provide over 90% of the population’s dietary needs. We are already massively over-dependent on a fraction of the world’s available species. Seeds that are genetically engineered and controlled transnationally will reduce this active stock even further.

PSRG made a submission to the New Zealand Royal Commission on Genetic Modification and presented a number of expert witnesses in this field.

 

Enquiries to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

 

N.B. The terms genetic engineering (GE), genetic modification (GM) and biotechnology are used interchangeably when referring to procedures that change the DNA of an organism. Genetic engineering technology is only a part of biotechnology.